The New Prisoner Comic


I am extremely protective about certain things, as my commentary about Doomsday Clock demonstrates. You cannot get away with doing them unless you do them exactly the way I want them to be. On that basis, Titan’s new The Prisoner comic, written by Peter Milligan and drawn by Colin Lorimer, is on an AI, triple-decker, double-secret hiding to nothing.

It’s a six-issue limited series of which issue 1 has been published with no less than six different covers. I chose cover 3, which is an image taken from the legendary unpublished Jack Kirby Marvel version in the mid-Seventies.

This is the third attempt at a Prisoner comic, after Marvel’s two failed efforts (the other was by Steve Engelhart and Gil Kane) and DC’s mid-Eighties ‘Shattered Visage’ by Dean Motter. The first were attempts to adapt the series’ opening episode, ‘Arrival’, the second a deeply inadequate attempt to bring the Village into contemporary times which tied it to British Intelligence.

That introduced a new, female central character, whose name was coyly revealed to be Drake, who was led to the location of The Village, where Number Six had chosen to remain after it was opened up. That story was a mess but it’s greatest crime was turning Number Six into nothing more than a cantankerous contrarian.

On the strength of issue 1 alone, ‘The Uncertainty Machine’ takes a similar approach to ‘Shattered Image’: contemporary setting, new central character, Breen, an espionage milieu pertinent to the Twenty-First Century, and by the last couple of pages, Breen is in the Village.

There’s not enough to go on to decide whether this is going to be any good or not. If anything, issue 1 reminds me more of Person of Interest, and John Reece’s black ops background, for all that Breen in part of MI5 (in a section called The Unit). Breen and his (female) partner Carey are caught in a trap, he gets out, she dosn’t, he wants to rescue her, refuses orders to terminate her.

This time, the concept of The Village is that of an ultra-mysterious independent organisation, whereabouts unknown, ‘loyalties’ random. Whether they have a physical location seems to be in doubt. Nothing is known about their controller, Number One. It’s suggested that they may have taken Carey, whose knowledge is vital, hence the orders to kill her.

Instead, Breen steals Pandora, an unknown, highly-guarded object, to attract the attention of The Village, and he gets it. He is gassed, wakes up in piped blazer, polo neck and slacks and In The Village.

The true test is going to be next issue, when we’ll see if writer Milligan and Lorimer have the chops to create the feel essential to making this a success. Milligan certainly the ability but this is my first exposure to Lorimer and I’m not impressed. His art is functional, rough-edged, unexceptional. But I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt for now.

There’s not enough even to guess at yet, especially not as to whether Number Six will appear. I’d prefer it if he didn’t: I have a sneaking suspicion that if he does, he will appear as Number Two, or even Number One. That’s iconoclastic enough for Milligan, but it would kill the whole thing stone dead if that’s what he’s got up his sleeve. We shall see.

So no rush to judgement on this issue alone because it’s all set up, and the all-action C21 running, jumping and shooting espionage stuff need not pertain to the hopefully archaic times inside The Village. That’s what I’m hoping to see. Time will tell.

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