The Fall Season 2016: The Big Bang Theory season 10


Ahhhhh!

With The Big Bang Theory returning for its tenth season, and the last of its three-season contract, there was a debate yesterday over whether it would – or should – be renewed for an eleventh year that would place it alongside Friends and Frasier for longevity.

As you’d imagine, it was another excuse for those who don’t like the show, who’ve never liked the show or used to like it but think it’s gone off the boil to demand that it not be renewed, or that time machines be employed to ensure it never got broadcast at all.

One advantage of age, and losing your insecurity, is the wonderful ability to ignore these people completely. You don’t like, you don’t watch it. If you choose to watch it and don’t like it, it’s you, not me, who is the idiot. There are hundreds of other programmes to choose from, hundreds of which I don’t like: tell you what, I won’t interfere with your enjoyment of what you like.

Of course the show isn’t as good as it used to be, but it’s still plenty funny for me and the opening episode of season 10 gave me plenty of laughs. Much of it sprung from the unresolved ‘cliffhanger’ that rather limply ended season 9, on the eve of Leonard and Penny’s ceremonial ‘re-marriage’: did Leonard’s dad sleep with Sheldon’s mom?

The answer was no, but not before some prolonged wicked humour from Sheldon, waspish about coitus, genitals and defilement, and Beverley, Leonard’s mom, consumed with mutual loathing for her ex-husband.

And there was Penny’s family to meet for the first time: we’ve long been familiar with Keith Carradine as her father, Wyatt, but now we got to see her mother (Katy Segal) and her brother Randall (Jack McBrayer), newly released from prison at last and far more wiling to talk about his past as a manufacturer of illegal drugs than was his mother. They were brilliant.

And we still didn’t get to find out Penny’s surname!

The subplot with Howard and Raj was well below the rest of the episode and could have done with being postponed until next week. Frankly, I’d forgotten completely that Howard had apparently created perpetual motion and that the Air Force had immediately contacted him. That was built up, with more paranoia, which will hopefully work better when it has room to breathe in its own right.

I still enjoyed it, and I’m looking forward to twenty-three more episodes between now and next May. The Fall Season starts here.

 

End of Term Report: The Big Bang Theory


Still funny after all these years

Season 9 of The Big Bang Theory has closed out with rather less of a stinger moment than we’re used to, which will no doubt lead to another hailstorm of criticism that it isn’t as funny as it was when it started, more demands to get rid of the girls and yet more sneering from those who despise the show as the worst kind of pre-strained pap ever recorded.

Me, I still like it and here’s to season 10, coming up in September.

I’ve been a fan of TBBT since I first saw it, on C4, very early into its first season, and I’ve loved it ever since. It’s not the first sitcom I’ve found hilarious, but it is unique in being the only one that I can watch constantly and still find as funny as if I were watching it for the first time.

Of course it isn’t as funny as it used to be, and of course it’s changed over nine seasons. Nothing gets to stay as good forever, especially when it’s broadcast 207 episodes. I mean, Porridge lasted 21 episodes, Fawlty Towers 12 and The Office 12 plus two specials. And, over nine seasons, the characters have evolved as a result of their experiences: for them not to have done so would have been ridiculous.

Season 9 has been the middle of a three season order that’s allowed the show to run easily. Possibly it has gotten a little lazy. This season began with the aftermath of Leonard and Penny’s spur of the moment wedding, but the show chose to have its cake and eat it by keeping Leonard living with Sheldon. The jokes about Penny being out of Leonard’s class have only mutated slightly. It’s been business as usual, with the main developments being ones that the show, in its formative years, wouldn’t have countenanced: Sheldon having sex with Amy at mid-season, Raj having two girlfriends at the same time and, the dreaded cliche, Bernadette becoming pregnant.

I don’t laugh as often as I do. One or two episodes were a bit dull. And the season ender had the smell of unfinished business about it, as if there were was another episode to come in which the set-ups would be resolved. It felt rather unsatisfactory if that is to be left hanging over the summer.

There’s been talk that TBBT will end after the tenth season. If that’s so, then sobeit. I have loved this show for what will this time next year be a full decade precisely because it is the closest a TV sitcom has come to understanding me. It’s geek humour: its subjects, its themes, its characters’ inadequacies are all things I know from the inside out, and it has reflected me back onto the screen over and overĀ  again. I think Kaley Cuoco is gorgeous and her comic timing is brilliant: her relationship with Leonard has gone through all the stages of my love life and I have howled in recognition more times than I could possibly ever count.

It means that I can never be entirely objective about the show, and that I really couldn’t give a damn about other people’s opinions: if you don’t like it, fuck off and watch something else. It’s not like you haven’t got a choice. For me, even half good TBBT is funnier than anything else out there at the moment, and if it doesn’t get to season 11, I will miss it more than any other series I’ve ever watched.

Back with a Bang!


I am an unashamed fan of The Big Bang Theory and I have been since seeing what was probably no later than its second episode, on Channel 4, many years ago. I have belly-laughed at its jokes and its characters more often than any other comedy series I have seen, and such is the beauty of this series that there are episodes I have seen literally a half dozen times over, and still I find myself exploding in delighted roars every time I see them again.

Honestly, there is no other series about which I could say that.

So, does that make TBBT some sort of uber-comedy, perfect in every respect, an ideal never to be bettered? No, of course it doesn’t. One other thing that distinguishes TBBT from everything else I have seen is that it is a massive success in America, the top TV show on that side of the Atlantic, a series that, after completing seven seasons, was renewed for another three! I really am not used to finding myself in the middle of a mass audience for anything (except Manchester United, and that’s something completely different).

All I can say is that The Big Bang Theory is the comedy that is most perfectly attuned to my sense of humour and my experiences in life.

For those who, strange though it may be, have no idea what TBBT is about, it centres upon four highly intelligent but deeply geeky and socially inept scientists, and the beautiful, blonde, mid-western would-be actress who moves in across the landing. Penny may be considerably less smart than Leonard and Sheldon, indeed be not that clever at all, but she possesses all the street smarts and more, enough for all the geeks with plenty left over to spare.

From there, the show has expanded its cast and range,and in recent series has taken on a Friends-like aspect. Howard, the short, Jewish, sex-obsessed, mother-dominated nerd has married the short, waspish Bernadette, Sheldon, who occupies a place on the autism spectrum, who is wholly self-obsessed, has found a girlfriend in the perpetually frustrated Amy, who took nearly four seasons just to get him to kiss her.

What makes it work so spectacularly well with me is that I understand these characters. I may not be up on the latest developments in fantasy and SF in comics, TV, games, films etc., but they speak my language, and it’s a language I’m fluent at. I know the jokes, I know the references, I’ve stood in their shoes. And when it comes to the social ineptness, yearning towards but clumsiness with women, the lack of confidence, the lack of success that they all collectively and individually suffer, I’ve stood in those shoes too,and I’e currently got a pair that, in a dim light, look pretty much the same.

Penny is, of course, both a fantasy and a joy. Kaley Cuoco is gorgeous, but more important than that, she’s a superb natural comedian, with brilliant timing on pauses and double-takes. That after seven seasons she’s gotten engaged to Leonard is highly improbable, but within the characters these two have played since 2007, is entirely believable within the series (and doubtless enhanced by the fact that Cuoco and Johnny Galecki, who plays Leonard, were involved in a secret relationship in the early years of the show.

I will be honest and say that I found season seven to be patchy, unlike its predecessors. Sheldon, played briliantly by Jim Parsons, has dominated the show since its early days, but Sheldon has progressed far less than the others: it is, after all, an integral part of his character that he is both impervious and ultra-resistant to change, but it does make him very wearing on occasions, and the humiliations he heaps on the ever-hopeful Amy do come close to infringing the Law of Comedy of Embarrassment at the best of times.

Anyway, the whole point of this post is to celebrate the return of the show for season eight: the by now traditional double-episode premiere, broadcast around midnight our time in America, and already streamed and eagerly devoured here. There are new themes: Sheldon has returned from the rail trip he set out on at the end of season 7, having criss-crossed the whole of America without once leaving the train station: he has finaly got his wish to stop studying the now-exploded String Theory and change his field to Dark Matter, but has been punished horribly: he had had to accept a promotion to Junior Professor and more salary, but now has to teach. Sionce every student thinks he’s obnoxious, nobody’s signed up for his class, except Howard who, after years of Sheldon belittling him over his not having a Ph.D, has finally decided to go for it.

Meanwhile, Penny – who has cut her hair surprisingly short, without compromising Kaley Cuoco’s looks – has lucked her way into a serious non-acting job as a pharmaceutical rep for the company where Bernadette works (she gets the job because her interviewer is every bit as afraid of the tiny, squeaky-voiced Bernadette as Penny is!).

It’s still taking small steps, but with three more years at least to run, The Big Bang Theory isn’t going to let things stagnate completeky, and it has my permission to develop in this manner for as long as it likes. I’m still as into it as ever, and life is naturally sunnier, even in stressful times, by the prospect of a new episode coming back.

Penny, Leonard, Sheldon, Howard, Raj, Bernadete, Amy, Stuart – welcome back buddies!